Monthly Archives: September 2020

Out and About 11: All About that Bass

I returned to Australia from my most recent field trip to Mongolia in September 2019. Due to the unfolding impact of the Coronavirus, here we continue to experience varying degrees of ‘lock down’ including not being permitted to travel overseas. So there will be no fieldwork for me in Mongolia this year. In its place I have returned my attention to becoming a better bass player (pictured here with my Kala U-Bass). I play bass for the Melbourne Ukelele Community. We Zoom twice a week, every week. Photo: C Pleteshner (selfie). 16 September 2020.

I returned to Australia from my most recent field trip to Mongolia in September 2019. Due to the unfolding impact of the Coronavirus, I continue to experience varying degrees of  ‘lock down’ including not being permitted to travel overseas. So there will be no fieldwork for me in Mongolia this year. In its place I have turned my attention to becoming a better bass player (pictured here with my Kala U-Bass). I play bass for the Melbourne Ukelele Community. We Zoom twice a week, every week. Photo: C Pleteshner (selfie). 16 September 2020.

Since the beginning of 2020 the Coronavirus manifestation has unfolded adding an unexpected colophon to my otherwise well-honed fieldwork-in-Mongolia trajectory and annual international travel routine.

Whilst certain continuities and ideas about one’s socially-constructed self (i.e. ‘what I do‘ as a mind’s eye reflection of ‘who I am‘) have been unexpectedly disrupted, Covid19’s lingering presence in Australia for now requires that we refrain from travelling to other countries and instead stay and work from home.

As the virus continues to mutate it has yet to become clear as to where the arc of Covid19-related broader social change will lead us, let alone how this may impact on my out-in-the-field ethnographic study in Mongolia and its presentation here.

However a parallel narrative has been unfolding: how during this same time there has been a welcomed development in two of my important at home continuities, the study of music and that of Buddhist philosophy Gelug-style.

In this context, having already established and developed mutually-enriching face-to-face communication with mentors and peers the other important if not critical-to-the task enablers are the vast array of currently available information and communication technologies (ICTs) when one has worked out how to use them well and selectively for one’s own purposes.

And so in recents weeks as part of a wider review of what I do and how I’ve been doing it, I have also come to the conclusion that as an information design framework for the presentation and communication strategy for my endeavours in this the digital public domain, that the inter-locking and multimedia ‘broad fields’ design of this website as initially conceived and implemented back in January 2014 in tandem with its sister YouTube channel are robust and fluid enough to accomodate possible future shifts in foci.

If for pragmatic reasons I decide to ‘pivot my interests’ (although not mine, such a nice turn of phrase don’t you think?) in response to prolonged international travel restrictions and other changes here in Oz, I think these two digital properties may continue to serve you, my readers in the public domain just as well.

With such an array of ICTs now at our fingertips, there is really no excuse. It’s the perfect time to just get on with the doing. How fortunate we are! More time to practice. More time to explore, study and learn to do the things we consider important.

Here’s New York-based Kate Davis performing her fabulous version of All About that [Upright] Bass.

© 2013-2021 CP in Mongolia. This post Out and About 11: All About that Bass is licensed under the  Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.  Posted: 16 September 2020. Last updated: 25 September 2020.